For years people have been told that skipping breakfast would lead to overeating later in the day and weight gain, but this small study casts doubt on that idea. Researchers recruited 24 healthy-weight students for the study, half ate breakfast regularly and the rest skipped breakfast. In one experiment, study participants were given no breakfast, a high carbohydrate breakfast, or a high fibre breakfast on three different occasions. They were then allowed to eat as much as they wanted at lunch. In the second study they were either given no breakfast or a larger, normal carbohydrate breakfast that was again followed by an all-you-can-eat lunch. In the first study neither eating breakfast nor the type of breakfast eaten affected the amount of food eaten at lunch. In the second study feelings of hunger and food intake at lunch increased when the participants skipped breakfast. But since the breakfast in that study averaged 624 calories and the people only ate 144 calories additional calories at lunch on day they skipped breakfast there was a net deficit of more than 400 calories on that day. The authors concluded that for some adults, skipping breakfast could be an effective way to cut calorie consumption.