Breakfast, Especially Cereal Breakfasts, Are Associated With Better Nutrition

People who eat breakfast, especially those who eat ready-to-eat cereal for breakfast, are more likely than people who don’t eat breakfast to have nutritionally adequate diets, according to this study funded by Kellogg Canada Inc.

Researchers used a 24-hour diet recall to collect information on nutrient intake from 19,913 people who took part in the Canadian Community Health Study 2.2.

Usual intakes of nutrients were estimated and compared to estimated average requirements (EAR) and the tolerable upper intake levels (UL) for several nutrients.

Of the participants, 11% did not eat breakfast, 20% ate ready-to-eat cereal, and 69% ate other kinds of breakfast.

Compared to people who didn’t eat breakfast, breakfast eaters were more likely to have significantly higher intake of fiber and several vitamins and minerals, especially cereal eaters.

The prevalence of intakes below the EAR for vitamin A, magnesium, calcium, thiamin, vitamin D, and iron were lower among cereal eaters than they were among other breakfast eaters.

Breakfast consumption alone was not associated with consumption of nutrients above the UL, but the combination of eating breakfast and taking supplements led to slightly higher prevalence of intakes above the UL for several nutrients, compared to not eating breakfast.

Best Breakfast Cereal

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