This year’s most popular hairdo for men; the man bun has been sported by everyone from Leonardo DICaprio to Jared Leto, yet it has some serious uncool side effects to it.

Traction alopecia –traction alopecia is a form of alopecia, or gradual hair loss, caused primarily by pulling force being applied to the hair.

Dermatologists warn that donning this fashionable hairdo too tightly for too long could result in hair loss. Perhaps you’re seen or worn one sometime this year.

If you’re been living under a rock or do not know what a man bun is. It’s exactly what it sounds like; a knotted bun on top of your head or at the nape of the neck, worn by men.

According to Medical Daily, “Unfortunately, a person who wears their hair tightly pulled back for long periods of time can end up developing traction alopecia, a condition characterized by mild baldness around the hairline and temples.

The constant pulling of hair leads to inflammation and scarring which forms around the follicles; on the microscopic level.

This in turn, will prevent new hair growth but although it might sound nasty; ‘traction alopecia- related baldness is gradual and relatively painless.’

Do not be one of those who realise the full effect of their tight hairstyles when it’s too late.

Sabra Sullivan, a dermatologist said that although this condition is commonly seen in women, she has seen an increase in male cases.

“It’s really, really common. I see it probably once or twice a week. They’re putting traction on the hair follicles that the hair is not really meant to take. Traction alopecia in men is becoming more common.”

You can do damage to your hair follicles, along with dreadlocks as well as fervent brushing and combing. Although traction alopecia can be treated in its earliest stages, once scarring has begun; it’s irreversible.

Worried that you have to let go of your favourite hairstyle, just to spare your precious mane? Dermatologists, agree that just wearing your hair style looser is enough to prevent any serious damage to your follicles.

Sources: Medical Daily

Alice Paulse