As summer slowly creeps in, and you’re keen to get rid of that pale winter glow and go for a more sun-kissed look.

There are a few things that you should be aware of; like using baby oil to tan is never a good idea and what do you do if the sun-kissed your skin a bit too much?

Save your hide with advice from Dr Leigh Ann Price, director of the burn fellowship programme at Johns Hopkins Burn Center.

Know your hot spots

If you have a large burn on your face, hands or genitalia (eina), go to the hospital, and hurry!

Ease a basic burn

If your skin is red (like a sunburn) but there is no blistering, you probably have a first-degree burn. Moisturise your skin and keep it hydrated, after it’s healed, use sunscreen for further protection.

Heal deeper damage

See a blister? You probably have at least a second-degree burn. Is the skin beneath the blister pink, moist and painful? Wash the burn in tepid water with a mild soap, such as Dove.

Use aloe vera to keep the wound moist, as antibiotic creams aren’t necessary and may actually cause irritation.

Know when to call a doctor

If you have no pain and no blisters (or a blister with a dry bottom layer) and your skin is pale and looking leathery, you are likely to have a third-degree burn. See a doctor-as you may need a skin graft.