WHEN YOU’RE UP…

JOHN SMIT

“A couple years back I was in the change room doing my thing before the game, the same way I always did. I was kind of expecting the guys to start climbing the walls and headbutting each other because they were so fired-up, but instead I was staring back at these deadpan faces. I realised that if you’ve been around for some time, you’ve got to mix things up a bit, press different buttons to get the same results out of your team.

Guys get used to how you activate them, so you need to learn to motivate differently to get the same results.”

… AND WHEN YOU’RE DOWN

SCHALK BURGER

“Losing at half-time is obviously not ideal. As captain, my approach will depend on how the first half’s gone. If my team has played badly, I take a hard line: use some strong words to get the guys focused and motivated. If we’ve played well and the other team has outplayed us, I’ll simply make some small tactical changes and roll with that confidence.”

THE BEST WAY TO SILENCE YOUR CRITICS

Naas Botha

“When you’re playing away from home, hostile fans are a part of the game – just like critics are a part of life. I didn’t always appreciate having naartjies thrown at me, but I did take the abuse as a form of self-motivation . Something I could never

figure out about rugby fans is that when I was lining up to take a penalty kick, they would boo, but when I scored, they would cheer. That’s when I knew, the only way I can keep you quiet is by beating you.”