Almost everyone knows someone who snores. If you don’t, its probably you. Reports suggest that snoring in the general population varies widely (from 15 to 54 percent) -mainly because most studies rely on self-reporting by patients. Despite the evidence that snoring is a major burden, the management of it is poorly investigated.

According to Medical Daily, there have been an array of treatments proposed for primary snoring – including, avoiding alcohol and sedatives, avoiding lying flat on the back to sleep, weight loss, treatment of nasal problems, palate and upper airway surgeries, and use of dental sleep devices.

Alas, there is hope. A Brazilian study published today in the Online First section of the journal CHEST finds that in patients with snoring problems can find relief in oropharyngeal exercises, or mouth and tongue, exercises. Research findings suggest that the frequency of snoring by 36 percent and total power of snoring by 59 percent.

Exercises included:

  • Pushing the tip of the tongue against the roof of the mouth and sliding the tongue backward
  • Sucking the tongue upward against the roof of the mouth, and pressing the entire tongue against the roof of the mouth
  • Forcing the back of the tongue against the floor of the mouth while keeping the tip of the tongue in contact with the bottom, front teeth
  • And elevating the back of the roof of the mouth and uvula while saying the vowel “A”

“This study demonstrates a promising, noninvasive treatment for large populations suffering from snoring, the snorers and their bed partners, that are largely omitted from research and treatment,” said Barbara Phillips, MD, FCCP, President-Designate, American College of Chest Physicians, and Medical Director, Sleep Laboratory at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine.