Boost bone mass with excercise?

Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy of the University of Gothenburg, Sweden used data from 833 men who enrolled in the Gothenburg Osteoporosis and Obesity Determinants (GOOD) study in their late teens or twenties to compare self-reported physical activity levels to bone density changes over a five-year period.

Bone density and bone size were measured with a variety of tests at baseline and again five years later. Men who reported increased levels of physical activity at the follow-up visit were significantly likely to show increased overall bone mineral content, areal bone mineral density of the lumbar spine and hip, cortical cross section area, and trabecular bone density.

Risk of significant bone loss (one in four older men can currently expect to suffer from osteoporosis) and attendant fractures in later life is greatly predicted by peak bone mass in one’s teens and twenties, so anything that boosts bone mass in that period has the potential to significantly reduce one’s risk decades later.