E-cigarettes broke into the market claiming to be a healthier alternative to normal cigarettes which can even help users quit smoking. But some researchers disagree, alluding to a lack of data to support these claims.

According to the authors of this research letter, no studies support the claim that using e-cigarettes help users quit smoking, citing various literature. Furthermore, they investigated whether e-cigarette use predicted smoking cessation through a one-year study. Researchers had adequate data on baseline e-cigarette use, cigarette use and intentions to quit from 949 current smokers. They neither found an association between baseline e-cigarette use and greater intention to quit smoking nor predicting quitting a year later. While stated intention to quit smoking and the number of cigarettes smoked per day did predict quitting, the use of e-cigarettes within the last 30 days did not, say the authors.

Despite some study limitations, the authors believe that their findings add to data that e-cigarettes do not help users quit smoking. They add that e-cigarette sellers shouldn’t be allowed to advertise their devices for smoking cessation until those claims are supported by scientific evidence.