Eating fewer than 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day is linked to shorter survival and higher mortality

Getting five or more servings of fruits and vegetables per day is often recommended. The major focus of studies on the effect of fruit and vegetable consumption have been on disease, while few studies have looked at the effect on death. This study evaluated the effect of fruit and vegetable consumption on survival and all-cause mortality among 71,706 people who took part in either the Cohort of Swedish men or the Swedish Mammography Cohort. During the 13-year follow-up 11 439 people died. Compared to people who ate five servings of fruit and vegetables per day, those who ate progressively fewer serving had progressively shorter survival and progressively higher mortality. Compared to people who ate five servings per day, those who did not eat any fruits and vegetables (?!) lived three years fewer and had a 53% higher mortality rate. For fruit consumption alone, people who never ate fruit lived 19 months fewer than people who ate a single serving of fruit per day. Compared to people who ate up to three servings of vegetables per day, those who ate no vegetables lived 32 months fewer. But, it appears that eating more than five servings of fruits and vegetables per day, more than a single serving of fruit per day, and more than three servings of vegetables per day were not associated with longer survival or decreased mortality.