Men who were circumcised as children have a slightly lower risk of prostate cancer than uncircumcised men.

There is some evidence that infectious agents play a role in the development of prostate cancer.

Infections could cause inflammation or cellular damage that promote the development of prostate cancer.

Research suggests that being circumcised reduces a man’s risk of several diseases, including sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Because circumcision reduces the risk of getting an STI, researchers wondered if circumcision could also reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

They conducted a case-control study that included 1,754 men with prostate cancer and 1,645 controls. Men who were circumcised were 15% less likely to have prostate cancer than men who were not circumcised.

The protective benefits of circumcision were only seen among men who were circumcised before their first intercourse. These findings lend weight to the idea that an infectious/inflammatory pathway is involved in the development of some cases of prostate cancer.