Sounds like trouble: even in the absence of sleep apnoea, snoring may raise your risk of heart disease and stroke, say researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

Snorers without sleep apnoea were more likely than silent snoozers to have thickened, narrowed carotid arteries, a precursor to atherosclerosis and blood clots. One theory: your palate vibrates when you snore, inflaming carotid arteries nearby, says study author Dr Robert Deeb.

If you’re a snorer, find a 
sleep clinic. Sleep Clinic has a directory of clinics around South Africa or ask your doctor to help you choose a snoring intervention – like an appliance that can keep your tongue from blocking your airway.