People with Lynch syndrome have a high risk for developing colorectal cancer. This study suggests that if people with Lynch syndrome eat a poor diet their risk could get even higher.

Researchers at the University of the Netherlands contacted 486 people with Lynch syndrome and interviewed them about their diets.

Four dietary patterns were identified: prudent (high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains), meat (high in meat and coffee), snack (high in fried snacks, fast food, and diet soda), and Cosmopolitan (similar to the Mediterranean diet).

After 20 months of follow-up, adenomas (polyps, precursors to colon cancer) were detected in 58 people.

There were statistically nonsignificant reductions in risk with the prudent diet and nonsignificant increases with the meat and Cosmopolitan diets.

Only the junk-food rich snack pattern was associated with a significant increase in risk.

People in the group with the highest scores on the snack pattern had a 2.16-fold higher risk of colorectal adenomas than those with the lowest scores.

While this study cannot prove that diet caused the higher risk, it suggests that dietary patterns might be associated with the development of adenomas among people with Lynch syndrome.