Regular Consumption Of Caffeinated Coffee Linked To Lower Risk Of Death
From Mouth And Throat Cancers

Epidemiological studies have found a link between coffee consumption and a lower risk of developing oral/pharyngeal cancer.

This study investigated if coffee consumption was also associated with a lower risk of dying from oral/pharyngeal cancer.

Researchers analyzed data on consumption of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and tea from 968,432 people who took part in the Cancer Prevention Study II. None of them had oral/pharyngeal cancer at the start of the study, but 868 people died from the disease during the 26-year follow-up.

Drinking four or more cups of caffeinated coffee per day was associated with a 49% lower risk of dying from oral/pharyngeal cancer than no or occasional consumption. Each additional cup consumed per day was associated with lower risk of death.

There was a statistically nonsignificant 39% lower risk associated with the consumption of more than two cups of decaffeinated coffee per day, but there was no association between tea consumption and risk of death from oral/pharyngeal cancer.

One important limitation of this study was the lack of information about HPV status, a common cause of pharyngeal cancer. More research is needed to find out why caffeinated coffee is associated with lower risk of death from oral/pharyngeal cancer.