Higher green tea and coffee consumption linked to lower stroke risk among adults

Japanese researchers examined the associations between green tea and coffee consumption and stroke risk among 82,369 middle-aged adults.

At the start of the study none of the participants had cardiovascular disease. Information on tea and coffee intake was collected at the start of the study. During the average 13-year follow-up there were 3,425 strokes and 910 cases of coronary heart disease.

Compared to seldom drinking tea, drinking two to three cups per day of green tea was associated with a 14% lower risk of stroke and drinking four or more cups per day with a 20% lower risk.

Compared to seldom drinking coffee, drinking at least one cup of coffee per day was associated with about a 20% lower risk of stroke.

Drinking at least one cup of coffee per day or two or more cups of green tea per day was associated with a 32% lower risk of a type of stroke known as intracerebral hemorrhage.

In Japan a typical cup of coffee or tea is about six ounces. No significant associations were found between coffee and green tea consumption and coronary heart disease risk.